Rumi’s Tomb

During my travels through Turkey, I had the opportunity to visit the Mevlana Museum, which is also the mausoleum of the Persian poet and Islamic mystic generally known as Rumi.

According to the Encyclopædia Britannica:

Rūmī [was] the greatest Sufi mystic and poet in the Persian language, famous for his lyrics and for his didactic epic Mas̄navī-yi Maʿnavī (“Spiritual Couplets”), which widely influenced mystical thought and literature throughout the Muslim world. After his death, his disciples were organized as the Mawlawiyyah order.

in his being claimed variously for Turkish literature and Persian literature, a reflection of the strength of his influence in Iran and Turkey. The influence of his writings in the Indian subcontinent is also substantial. By the end of the 20th century, his popularity had become a global phenomenon, with his poetry achieving a wide circulation in western Europe and the United States.

[…]

Rūmī lived for a short while after completing the Mas̄navī. He always remained a respected member of Konya society, and his company was sought by the leading officials as well as by Christian monks. His burial procession, according to one of Rūmī’s contemporaries, was attended by a vast crowd of people of many faiths and nationalities. His mausoleum, the Green Dome, is today a museum in Konya; it is still a place of pilgrimage, primarily for Turkish Muslims.

Interestingly, I also learned that Rumi’s epitaph says:

“When we are dead, seek not our tomb in the earth, but find it in the hearts of men.”


Here’s a clip of what it looked and sounded like to be there:

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